The One Supplement You Should Never Go Without

Vitamin D may be associated with bone health, but there is so much more to this hormone-like vitamin. When it comes to the brain, it protects neurons from damage and is involved in the transmission of messages. It is essential for the regulation of healthy mood and memory.

A broad spectrum of neurological disorders has been linked to vitamin D insufficiency. These disorders include depression, schizophrenia, dementia (including Alzheimer’s disease), and Parkinson’s disease.

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Olives: The Acceptable Face of Snacking

A plump green or wrinkly black olive is the perfect amuse-bouche for pre-dinner loafing, especially when entertaining. Olives also make an ideal emergency snack food, not just because of their suggestion of sophistication but because of their high fat, fibre, and vitamin E content. Furthermore, despite being a fruit, the olive contains virtually no carbohydrate. Perfect for all you low-carb weight-watchers.

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Why You Should Always Choose the Full-Fat Option

Removing the fat from a whole food benefits no one, other than the manufacturer doing the removing. That may come as a surprise to some, but don’t believe the health hype. Here are five reasons why you should always choose the full-fat, unadulterated version over the hollowed-out shell of an alternative.

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Would You Have a Faecal Transplant for the Sake of Your Mental Health?

FMT is highly effective in the treatment of antibiotic-resistant gastrointestinal infection caused by the bacterium Clostridium difficile, or C. diff. C. diff frequently arises after a course of antibiotics and is often fatal. FMT works by altering the patient’s microbiome, the collection of living microorganisms in the gut. It all begins with research. Now, with what we know about the gut-brain connection, and the role that bacteria play in influencing the mind, FMT has sparked interest in the field of mental health research too.

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Heal Your Gut, Heal Your Skin

You may not always love the skin you’re in, but there are countless microorganisms that do and are happy to make it their home. Just as the gut houses its own microbiome — colonies of bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and others — the skin has its own living microbiome. “Cumulative evidence” shows that there is bidirectional communication between gut and skin and that what happens in the gut often shows up on the skin.

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The Health Benefits of Skipping Breakfast

There is a reason why most people have little or no appetite on waking: the human body clock and the production of cortisol. Cortisol is an adrenal hormone produced cyclically: levels start to rise between 3 am and 6 am, and within thirty to forty minutes after waking, most people experience a two- to three-fold surge in circulating levels. In what is termed the ‘awakening cortisol response,’ cortisol mobilizes glucose and promotes gluconeogenesis, the manufacture of glucose from fat and protein.

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Do You Have leaky Brain Syndrome?

Your brain is like a powerful command centre, surrounded by a wall to prevent enemy elements from breaching security. Damage to the wall undermines the strength of the command centre. The blood brain barrier is that wall. If compromised, the brain is left vulnerable to assault and subsequent mental health problems

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Why You Crave Junk Food

Feeding potato chips to rats makes them want more, even when they are already full. Humans are remarkably similar. Open that bag and you know how it will end. Even so, go easy on yourself; you’re not weak, you’re normal. Your brain is responding the way it is programmed to respond. The trick is to short-circuit the system — the brain’s reward system.

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How Exercise Changes Your Brain and Your Mood

Beyond the runner’s high lies a biochemical process that is part of the brain’s growth and repair system. Central to that process is a protein called brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). BDNF protects existing brain cells from damage. It strengthens the synapses (a synapse is the structure between nerves, through which messages are transmitted), and helps form new synapses. BDNF is also involved in a process called neurogenesis, the creation of new brain cells.

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