How intermittent fasting with exercise can boost your brain

Most people practise intermittent fasting in order to lose weight, and it is indeed an effective strategy. Less well known are the neurological benefits, which include improved mood and memory, and reduced risk of stroke, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.

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How eating more fat can improve your memory

The dry weight of the brain is 60% fat. It’s all there: saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fat. There’s also a good deal of cholesterol, a fat-like substance. As well as forming part of the structure of the brain, and providing fuel, these fats play a role in maintaining memory and other aspects of cognitive function.

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How to stop Alzheimer’s before it begins

There is a mistaken but widespread belief that we are all helpless victims of cruel fate and random DNA, marching through our lives towards a preordained conclusion. Instead, the evidence suggests that developing dementia is largely a matter of what you eat and drink. Here are four dietary changes you can make now that can play a significant role in maintaining the health of the ageing brain.

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How fat babies develop healthy adult brains

Human babies are the only land mammals born fat, and there is good reason for that. When humans evolved from plant-eating tree-dwellers to omnivorous land-dwellers, an extraordinary burst of brain growth was triggered. The large human brain is dependent on fat for growth and function, from conception to old age.

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How to fight depression with vitamin D

Vitamin D is usually associated with bone health, but it also plays an important role in brain development — there are receptor sites for this vitamin throughout the brain. A whole spectrum of neurological disorders have been linked to lack of vitamin D, including depression.

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Why you need cholesterol for your mental health

Cholesterol is a significant component of the brain, where it plays a crucial role in healthy cognitive function, and protects against damage. Studies show that high cholesterol in elderly people is associated with better cognitive function. Because fat-soluble statins are able to cross into the brain and remove cholesterol, they may contribute to dementia, including Alzheimer’s.

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